The Victorians – Assessment

You can download the assessment here.
If you are unable to download the file, please see the questions for your assessment below in the yellow box. The sources are also below.

Assessment questions

1. How useful is source A for understanding life in the Victorian period? [8 marks]

2. How useful is source B for understanding life in the Victorian period? [8 marks]

3. How useful is source C for understanding life in the Victorian period? [8 marks]

When answering the questions, make sure you use the structure as outlined below to help you.

ESSAY STRUCTURE GUIDE

Content of the source
– From the source, I can see…
– This therefore suggests that…
– I know this is true because… (3x bits of evidence that backs up what the source suggests)

– From the source I can also see…
– This therefore suggests that…
– I know this is true because… (3x bits of evidence that backs up what the source suggests)

Provenance of the source
– This source was written by/in/to
– This makes/does not make the source trustworthy because…

Conclusion
– Overall, this source is very/somewhat/not very useful for understanding life in the Victorian period because…

What makes good evidence? SPEND!

When including evidence to back up what the sources suggest, use as much SPEND as you can. This helps you include specific evidence and shows the examiner that you have a good understanding of the topic:

Statistics – numbers to back up facts.
Places – Are there any relevant places you can think about that relate to the topic?
Events – Are there any events that you can remember that show you something about the topic?
Names – Are there any names that you can remember of important people in our topic?
Dates – Were there any significant dates in our topic?

SOURCE A: An illustration of a textile mill in Northamptonshire in the 1840s by a factory inspector.

Source A

SOURCE B: An extract from George Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier. Orwell travelled to industrial towns in the North of England to research how the Industrial Revolution affected the people there.

‘As we moved slowly through the outskirts of the town we passed row after row of little grey slum houses. At the back of one of the houses a young woman was kneeling on the stones, poking a stick up the leaden waste-pipe which ran from the sink inside and which I suppose was blocked. She looked up as the train passed, and I was almost near enough to catch her eye. She had a round pale face, the usual exhausted face of the slum girl who is twenty-five and looks forty, thanks to miscarriages and drudgery; and it wore, for the second in which I saw it, the most desolate, hopeless expression I have ever seen. She knew well enough what was happening to her – understood as well as I did how dreadful a destiny it was to be kneeling there in the bitter cold, on the slimy stones of a slum backyard, poking a stick up a foul drain-pipe’.

Source B

SOURCE C: A cartoon from Punch Magazine, a magazine that reported on news stories in the Victorian period. The two criminals are saying “it’s lucky for us that there are so bloomin’ few of the [police]”.

Source C

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: